Sarah Choresh

Sarah knew nothing about David's fate or what he was going through in the war. She did not even know that his battalion, the 66th Battalion, was fighting in Jerusalem.

When Sara Choresh’s husband, David, was drafted just before the Six-Day War, she was seven months pregnant with their eldest son. Since she did not want to be alone in their small apartment, she returned to her parents’ home in the Geula neighborhood. Sarah was worried and relieved to see him for a few hours on the Saturday before the war broke out. When war did break out, Sara and her parents went to the bomb shelter, but it suffered a direct hit and they spent the rest of the war in their apartment.

Sarah knew nothing about David’s fate or what he was going through in the war. She did not even know that his battalion, the 66th Battalion, was fighting in Jerusalem. One day, in her parent’s apartment, she heard soldiers in the stairwell looking for Sarah Greenwald (which was their last name at the time) and she was so anxious that they were coming to tell her that her husband had been killed – she fainted. They revived her and told her that he was alive, but wounded and hospitalized in the convalescent home Arza in Motza, which had been turned into a hospital. Her husband sent a handwritten note to prove that he was indeed alive.

Choresh decided to visit David immediately, even though public transportation was barely functioning. She walked to the central bus station and convinced the Tel Aviv bus driver to drop her off at Motza, near the road. From there the pregnant Choresh climbed all the way to the convalescent home, where the guard at the gate was alarmed to see her and quickly found a place for her to sit and drink water. The guard led her to her husband, David, and she found him wounded, pale and suffering from a high fever. She immediately began to take care of him – shaved him, washed him and nursed him until he recovered.

In September of that year, Sarah Choresh gave birth to their first son. Sarah and David named him Yinon, after David’s friend who fought alongside him and was killed. David still suffers some disability from his injuries, but he and Sarah continued their lives and raised three children.