Shifra Zuman

Shifra Zuman showed him the medal and told him of its history and the promise she made to her husband to return it to its original owner

Shifra Zuman’s husband was an Egged bus driver during the war, and after the war ended he drove parachutists to Jerusalem. When he returned home he brought something he had found in Jerusalem – a box with a medal in it.  Shifra was moved by the medal, she thought of the memories of its owners, and she swore that one day when there was peace with Jordan, she would try to locate the owner and return the medal. For years, Shifra exhibited the medal in her jewelry store, but she refused to sell it, saying that she intended to return it someday.

After Israel signed a peace treaty with Jordan, she began to think about how to implement her plan. One day, the Israeli Minister of Finance, Meir Sheetrit, happened to enter her jewelry store.  Shifra Zuman showed him the medal and told him of its history and the promise she made to her husband to return it to its original owner. Sheetrit put her in touch with the journalist Dahlia Ben-Ari who undertook to try to locate the person who owned the medal. If she succeeded she promised to take Shifra to Jordan to return the medal. After many efforts Ben-Ari did manage to find the owner of the medal. He was already in his eighties, a former commander in the Jordanian army who had become mayor of his town after he retired from the army. To Zuman’s regret, Ben-Ari did not keep her promise to take her to Jordan, but she did give Zuman a picture of the owner wearing the medal.

Shifra Zuman then sent him a gift of two silver pins shaped like doves of peace, made in her son’s jewelry store, for him and his daughter. Despite her hopes, the man did not stay in touch with her, but the medal, which accumulated even more memories since it was left in Jerusalem back in 1967, links them.